Politics

Jobs Don’t Exist So That You Can Support Your Family

I hear this argument all the time when discussing Minimum Wage laws: “How is a person supposed to survive, making X dollars an hour?” The answer, of course is, you’re not. The idea that every single job should pay enough to support a person and his whole family, is ludicrous. Think about the last time you paid someone to do a job for you; a plumber, landscaper, painter, or whatever. Did you come to an agreement on the price based on how much money the worker needed in order to pay his bills, or did you pay him or her based on the job performed? Continue reading

Robots Need Jobs Too

Image by Mendhak

Image by Mendhak

The case against job automation never made any sense to me, and it’s always made by people who are afraid their skills will become irrelevant, as machines and software are built that can perform jobs better and faster than any human can.

I can’t think of a more selfish act than being against economic progress so that one can continue to get paid to do a job less efficiently than it could otherwise be performed by someone else–or something else. Somehow, those against job automation are never as eager to discuss progress made in the past that has undoubtedly had a positive impact on society, despite the same kind of fear-mongering they participate in today. Continue reading

Legalize Discrimination

No Trespassing

Image by Aaron Jacobs on Flickr

The first amendment is the most well-known of all constitutional amendments. It states that the government cannot punish you for what you say, even if what you say is reprehensible.

Everyone claims to support freedom of speech, and they understand that supporting someone’s right to say what they want to say is not the same as agreeing with whatever is being said. I don’t think many Americans would support the idea that we should put in jail those who say racist things, because they understand that even jerks should have the freedom to say what they want, in a free society. Continue reading

Enough Demagoguery!

Obama pointing

Image by Marc Nozell on Flickr

It seems like the more complex a political issue is, the more it gets over-simplified by the Left, who have become experts at turning everything into a black-and-white situation. Whenever they present their solution to the public, they always start with the false premise that their solution works. Rather than make the debate about which policies would actually solve the problem, they would like everyone to come to the quick conclusion that if you are opposed to their solution, you must be against any solution, and you just don’t care about the people they are trying to “help.” Continue reading

The Reasons Why Most of Hollywood is Liberal

Red Carpet

Image by Marco Recuay on Flickr

Film executive and producer Harvy Weinstein, has plans to make an anti-gun movie and take aim at the NRA. This is the same Harvy Weinstein that has produced a number of violent movies featuring the very guns that he believes “we don’t need in this country.”

This shouldn’t surprise anyone. The vast majority of Hollywood is liberal. Rather than focus on what they do best, making movies, many in Hollywood use their unique position to promote the democrats’ political agenda. Continue reading

Be Thankful for Income Inequality

Luxury car

Image by Ffrade on Flickr

It’s one of the latest democratic talking points. Obama and the democrats are hoping to benefit in the 2014 elections, by bringing to the public’s awareness, the gap that exists between the income of the wealthy and that of the poor and middle class.

But why is “income inequality” even a problem? Is their ideal society one of income¬†equality?¬†I hope not. Income inequality is a feature of a free society, not a drawback. The fact that any man in the United States, even those born poor, have the opportunity to become richer than others, is what incentivizes them to take risks, and start businesses that provide the rest of us with the products and jobs that we need. It’s this promise that you can become rich if you can find a way to provide enough people with something that they need or want, that sparks innovation. It’s what provided the incentive for people like Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, and many others that have changed the world for the better. Continue reading

Minimum Wage Laws Hurt the Poor by Preventing Employment

Empty factory

Image by Ryan Remillard on Flickr

Minimum wage laws are one of the best examples of the negative unintended consequences that often result from good-intention laws that end up hurting the very people they are meant to help. For those who lack the most basic understanding of economics, it may seem like common sense. If there are people who don’t make enough money, why not just pass a law requiring that they be paid more?

Labor as a good

The problem with this approach becomes obvious once we start thinking of labor as just another good that is sold on the market. When we work for an employer we are essentially selling that employer a service. Economic laws apply to this good just as well as they apply to goods like milk, meat, etc, and yet many would agree that there is no need for government intervention when it comes to the price of these other goods. Continue reading

Why Student Loans Are a Bad Idea And Actually Hurt Students

Lecture Hall

Image by Winky on Flickr

College tuition costs have been skyrocketing and the more they go up, the more the government tries to help make college more affordable. Americans owe $1 trillion in student loans, even more than they owe in credit card debt. The federal government has been involved in student loans since 1958, either by guaranteeing loans made by private banks or by giving out loans themselves. Tuition rates have been increasing at about twice the rate of inflation, and still, proponents of federal student loans have yet to connect the dots.

Their intentions are good, but the government’s involvement is precisely what has resulted in the rise of tuition costs. Why do schools continue to increase their prices every year? Because they can. The government gives the schools whatever money they ask for, because “we must help everyone get a college degree.” If the government were to give everyone money to buy computers, the price of computers would also skyrocket.

Continue reading

Why the 17th Amendment is Bad and Should be Repealed

U.S. Constitution

Image by Mr T. in DC on Flickr

Before 1914, senators were not directly elected by the people. They were appointed by the state legislatures. The 17th amendment changed that, and not for the better. But why is it bad to have them be elected by the people? Isn’t that more democratic, and therefore, better? Not really.

The original intent of the founders was to have a Federalist system which consisted of individual states and a small central government with very limited powers. The idea was that the states would send the senators to Washington to represent them. If a senator started voting against the best interests of the state which he represented, he could be immediately recalled. Continue reading

Why the Arts Industry Doesn’t Need Government Funding

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is a U.S. government agency that provides funding for art projects. In 2001, it had a budget of $104 million. In 2012 it was $146 million. So while the U.S. debt went from $5 trillion to $16 trillion, we increased funding for the arts by $42 million.

What does the NEA do, exactly? In May 2011, for example, it gave $20,000 to a company called Amphibian Stage Productions for their Jumbies Fort Worth program. Continue reading